Kindergarten oral health promotion program

Categories

Categories associated with best practice:

  • Community
  • Health Equity
  • Individual
  • Early Childhood (ages 3-5) icon
  • Education and literacy
  • French
  • Healthy child development
  • Oral Health
  • Oral Health
  • Oral Health
  • Oral Health
  • Oral Health
  • Oral Health
  • Personal health practices and coping skills
  • Social environments

Overview

This kindergarten oral health promotion program has been set up to improve children’s environment to foster oral health. Specifically, the program is aimed at promoting tooth brushing among children from disadvantaged areas within kindergartens in Clermont-Ferrand, France. Oral health education sessions for parents are offered by l’Association CLCV (Consommation, Logement et Cadre de Vie). A travelling display of signs focusing on cavity prevention and dental care in young children has been prepared. Under the program, parents are invited to attend a session at the school. A dentist is available to answer questions. The parents receive an information packet on cavity prevention and dental care in children. Two successive health education sessions are given in each class. The sessions are facilitated by the class teacher, a dentist on temporary assignment, and odontology students. The sessions focus on teaching brushing technique and are organized in such a way that the children’s individual skills are developed. Each child receives a brushing kit that remains at the school. The sessions also provide training for the schoolteacher in how to supervise the students’ brushing sessions. The kindergarten tooth brushing program was evaluated one year after its implementation. The evaluation was based on the children’s biannual clinical examinations and the questionnaire administered to parents. Positive results were noted, including an increase in the mothers’ level of knowledge of oral health, as well as improved oral hygiene and the DMFT factor (number of decayed, missing and filled teeth) among children who had received the intervention. In fact, the test group’s average plague score at the end of the year was half that of the control group (Mann-Whitney, p < 0,0001). Similarly, at the start, 35% of the children were not brushing every day, as compared to 21% at the end of the year. However, the intervention had no impact on the seeking of dental care for the children.

Primary Source Document

N/A

Contact information of developer(s) and/or implementer(s)

N/A

Intervention Focus

N/A

Health Issue(s) that is/are addressed by the Intervention

N/A

N/A

Specific Activities of the Intervention

N/A

Priority/Target Population for Intervention Delivery

N/A

Outcomes

N/A

Adaptability

Implementation History

N/A

Expertise Required for Implementation within the Context of the Intervention

N/A

Are there supports available for implementation?

N/A

Are there resources and/or products associated with the interventions?

N/A