Food Dudes (UK)

Categories

Categories associated with best practice:

  • PP-icon1
  • Children (ages 6-12) icon
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Diabetes icon 3
  • Education and literacy
  • Elementary School Icon 1
  • English
  • Food Security
  • Healthy child development
  • Home
  • Income and social status
  • Social environments

Determinants of Health: Income and social status (including gap between rich and poor), Education, literacy and life-long learning, Social environments, Food security, Healthy child development

Overview

Studies evaluated the effects of four different procedures on children’s consumption of a range of fruit and vegetables presented to them. The procedures were as follows: fruit and vegetable presentation only; rewarded taste exposure; peer modelling; and rewarded taste exposure combined with peer modelling. Over 16 days, children watched six video adventures featuring heroic peers (the Food Dudes) who enjoy eating fruit and vegetables, and received small rewards for eating these foods themselves. Methods: Quasi-experimental design, pre-post-test. Results: Consumption during the intervention was significantly higher than during baseline at lunchtime and at snack time (Po0.001 in all instances). Consumption outside school was significantly higher during the intervention on weekdays (Po0.05) but not weekend days. Following the intervention, children’s liking for fruit and vegetables also showed a significant increase (Po0.001). Implications: The peer modelling and rewards-based intervention was shown to be effective in bringing about substantial increases in children’s consumption of, and expressed liking for, fruit and vegetables.

Primary Source Document

CF Lowe, PJ Horne, K Tapper, M Bowdery & C Egerton, Effects of a peer modelling and rewards-based intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in children European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2004) 58, 510-522

Contact information of developer(s) and/or implementer(s)

Bangor Food Research Unit Professor C Fergus Lowe Ph: 01248 382210 Email: c.f.lowe@bangor.ac.uk

Intervention Focus

Intervention Goal / ObjectiveLevel(s) TargetedEquity Focus
(en anglais seulement)
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.

Health Issue(s) that is/are addressed by the Intervention

Health Promotion

  • Healthy Eating

Risk Reduction

    Specific Activities of the Intervention

    • Educational health information offered

    Priority/Target Population for Intervention Delivery

    Life Stage

    • Children (age 6-12 years)

    Settings

    Educational Settings

    • Elementary school

    Community Setting

    • Home

    Outcomes

    Outcomes and Impact Chart
    Level of ImpactDescription of OutcomeEquity Focus
    Individual Level

    Fruit consumption:
    Snack time consumption: Baseline measures: 6% decrease for all schools and 12% decrease for lunch time consumption. After the intervention was introduced, there was 6% increase in snack time consumption. For snack time fruit, across all three schools, the results showed a significant main effect of phase, F(1, 265)=329.61,P<0.001, and a significant interaction between time and phase, F(1, 265)=44.02, P<0.001. This confirms what Figure 1 indicates, namely, that consumption was significantly higher overall in the intervention (with a mean of 71%) than in the baseline phase (48%), and that it declined % consumed over the course of baseline (51 to 45%), but increased during the intervention (68 to 74%). There were no significant interactions between phase and age, F(1, 265)¼ 1.17, NS, or between time, phase, and age, F(1, 265)=0.04, NS, indicating that this pattern of results applied to both 4–7- and 7–11- y-old children.

    Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.
    Individual Level

    Lunchtime consumption:
    Salford school had a 4% increase, and for the other two schools (Bangor and Harwell) it was a 34% increase. In the case of lunchtime fruit consumption in the Salford school, there was a significant main effect of phase, F(1,77)=269.82, P<0.001, and a significant interaction between time and phase, F(1, 77)=17.35, P<0.001. As Figure 1 shows, consumption was significantly higher during intervention (71%) than at baseline (27%), but showed a decline during baseline (33 to 21%) while remaining relatively stable during the course of the intervention (69 to 72%). There were also significant interactions between phase and age F(1, 77)=21.19, P<0.001, and between time, phase, and age, F(1, 77)=9.34, P<0.005
    Weekday Consumption
    The mean number of fruit portions consumed averaged 1.00 (s.d = 1.07) at baseline and 1.21 (s.d.=1.41) during the intervention.
    Weekend Consumption:
    The mean number of fruit portions consumed averaged 1.94 (s.d. = 1.95) at baseline and 2.01 (s.d. = 2.37) during the intervention.

    Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.
    Individual Level

    Vegetable consumption:
    Snack time consumption: at all three schools before the intervention was introduced was a decrease of 6% and after the intervention was introduced it was 1% increase. For snack time vegetables, there was a significant main effect of phase, F(1, 283)=337.73, P<0.001, and a significant interaction between time and phase, F(1, 283)=15.35, P<0.001. Again, this confirms that the intervention significantly increased vegetable consumption (ie from 38% in baseline to 68% in the intervention phase) and that consumption declined during baseline (41 to 35%), but remained stable, although at a much higher level, during the intervention (67 to 68%). There was also a significant interaction between phase and age, F(1, 283)=7.11, P<0.01, but no significant interaction between time, phase, and age, F(1, 283)=0.16, NS.

    Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.
    Individual Level

    Lunchtime consumption:
    Cooked vegetable consumption for all 3 schools (filled circles) before intervention was no change, and after the intervention there was 5% increase. Salad consumption decreased by 4% at Salford school. The lunchtime salad results from the Salford school showed a significant main effect of phase, F(1, 23)=21.13, P<0.001, but no significant interaction between time and phase, F(1, 23)=1.15, NS. Consumption was significantly higher during the intervention compared to baseline (46 and 9%, respectively) and remained fairly stable during both phases. There was no significant interaction between phase and age, F(1, 23)=2.73, NS, or between time, phase, and age, F(1, 23)=1.71, NS, indicating that this pattern of results applied to both 4–7- and 7–11-y old children
    Weekday Consumption
    The mean number of vegetable portions consumed averaged 0.68 (s.d.=0.81) at baseline and 1.23 (s.d.=1.55) during the intervention.
    Weekend Consumption:
    The mean number of vegetable portions consumed averaged 1.22 (s.d.=1.69) at baseline and 1.53 (s.d. = 1.56) during the intervention.

    Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.

    Adaptability

    Implementation History

    • Multiple implementations - Different settings/populations/providers - The intervention showed significant adaptability as it has been implemented in different settings or with different populations or by different provider(s). This can include multiple implementations during the same time period. Each implementation of the intervention must have been substantially the same and must have demonstrated positive results for the primary objectives of the intervention.

    Expertise Required for Implementation within the Context of the Intervention

    • Requires specialized skills that are easily available within the context - The intervention requires the participation of personnel with advanced skills (e.g. medical doctors, epidemiologists, social workers) but that are easily available within the intervention context.

    Are there supports available for implementation

    Yes. This programme is managed by Bord Bia and receives financial support from the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine and the European Union through the School Fruit Scheme.

    Are there resources and/or products associated with the interventions

    Yes. http://www.fooddudes.ie/main.html