The Jobs Program

Categories

Categories associated with best practice:

  • Health Equity
  • PP-icon1
  • Young Adult (ages 19-24) icon
  • Adult (ages 25-64) icon
  • Community/ Neighbourhood
  • Education and literacy
  • Employment and working conditions
  • Income and social status
  • Mental Health Icon 2
  • Personal health practices and coping skills

Overview

The Jobs Program is a job-search skill enhancement workshop, designed to prevent and reduce negative effects on mental health associated with unemployment and job-seeking stress, while promoting high-quality reemployment. The program teaches participants effective strategies for finding and obtaining suitable employment as well as for anticipating and dealing with the inevitable setbacks they will encounter. The program also incorporates elements to increase participants’ self-esteem, sense of control, and job search self-efficacy. By improving their job-seeking skills and sense of personal mastery, the program inoculates participants against feelings of helplessness, anxiety, depression, and other stress-related mental health problems.

Two large randomized field experiments found that the Jobs Program resulted in the return of unemployed workers to new jobs more quickly, re-employment in jobs that pay more, enhanced self-esteem, and reduction of depressive symptoms associated with prolonged unemployment, particularly among those most vulnerable to mental health problems. Subsequent replications, including in Ireland, Finland and the Netherlands, found consistently similar results.

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