Complex Obstacle Negotiation

Categories

Categories associated with best practice:

  • PP-icon1
  • Seniors (ages 65+) icon
  • Community/ Neighbourhood
  • Health Care Setting
  • Injury Prevention
  • Personal health practices and coping skills

Determinants of Health: Personal health practices and coping skills

Overview

All participants received 45 min of group training sessions once a week for 24 weeks. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the two training groups: standardized training with a complex obstacle course negotiation (CC) and standardized training with simple course negotiation (SC). The results of the present trial show that the participants who received individualized obstacle avoidance training under complex tasks combined with a traditional
intervention had a lower incidence rate of falls and fractures during the 12 months after the intervention.

Primary Source Document

Minoru Yamada, Tomoki Aoyama, Hidenori Arai, Koutatsu Nagai, Buichi Tanaka, Kazuki Uemura, Shuhei Mori and Noriaki Ichihashi , Complex obstacle negotiation exercise can prevent falls in community-dwelling elderly Japanese aged 75 years and older Geriatr Gerontol Int 2012; 12: 461–467

Contact information of developer(s) and/or implementer(s)

Mr Minoru Yamada PT PhD

Human Health Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine

53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan

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Intervention Focus

Intervention Goal / ObjectiveLevel(s) TargetedEquity Focus
Reduction in falls During the 12-month follow-up period after the intervention, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of falls in the SC group against the CC group was 9.37 (95% CI = 2.26–38.77).
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
9 secondary measures of gait, balance, and task performance (6 were significantly improved)
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Reduction in falls fractures: The IRR of fractures in the SC group compared with the CC group was 7.89 (95% CI = 1.01–61.49).
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.

Health Issue(s) that is/are addressed by the Intervention

Health Promotion

    Risk Reduction

    • Prevent injury

    Specific Activities of the Intervention

    • Other training session

    Priority/Target Population for Intervention Delivery

    Life Stage

    • Seniors (age 65+ years)

    Settings

    Educational Settings

      Community Setting

      • Community/neighbourhood
      • Health care setting

      Outcomes

      Outcomes and Impact Chart
      Level of ImpactDescription of OutcomeEquity Focus
      Individual Level9 secondary measures of gait, balance, and task performance (6 were significantly improved)Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.
      Individual LevelReduction in falls fractures: The IRR of fractures in the SC group compared with the CC group was 7.89 (95% CI = 1.01–61.49).Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.
      Individual LevelReduction in falls During the 12-month follow-up period after the intervention, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of falls in the SC group against the CC group was 9.37 (95% CI = 2.26–38.77).Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.

      Adaptability

      Implementation History

      • Implemented once (could be a pilot) - The intervention has been implemented once and is theoretically replicable elsewhere.

      Expertise Required for Implementation within the Context of the Intervention

      • Requires specialized skills that are easily available within the context - The intervention requires the participation of personnel with advanced skills (e.g. medical doctors, epidemiologists, social workers) but that are easily available within the intervention context.

      Are there supports available for implementation

      No.

      Are there resources and/or products associated with the interventions

      No.