Commit to Quit

Categories

Categories associated with best practice:

  • Individual
  • PP-icon1
  • Adult (ages 25-64) icon
  • Alcohol Abuse Icon 1
  • Community/ Neighbourhood
  • Education and literacy
  • English
  • Personal health practices and coping skills
  • Social environments

Determinants of Health: Personal health practices and coping skills, Education, literacy and life-long learning, Social environments, Gender

Overview

Commit to Quit was designed to test the efficacy of vigorous-intensity physical activity as an aid to smoking cessation for women. The rationale is that participation in regular physical activity among female smokers may aid in cessation efforts both by serving as an alternative to smoking and by reducing the weight gain associated with smoking cessation. Commit to Quit includes a group-based, 12-session smoking cessation program and a personalized, prescribed exercise program consisting of three sessions per week. Methods: Randomized control trial: methods, results, discussion. Results: Significantly higher levels of continuous abstinence at the end of treatment, 3 month follow up, 12 month follow up, significantly increased functional capacity, and gained less weight by the end of the treatment – compared with control subjects, exercise subjects achieved significantly higher levels of continuous abstinence at the end of treatment (19.4% vs. 10.2%) and 3 months (16.4% vs. 8.2%) and 12 months (11.9% vs. 5.4%) following treatment. exercise subjects had significantly increased functional capacity and gained less weight by the end of treatment. Other outcomes measured are V02 peak and weight gain. Implications: Vigorous exercise facilitates short- and longer-term smoking cessation in women when combined with a cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation program. Vigorous exercise improves exercise capacity and delays weight gain following smoking cessation.

Primary Source Document

Marcus BH, Albrecht AE, King TK, Parisi AF, Pinto BM, Roberts M, Niaura RS, Abrams DB., The efficacy of exercise as an aid for smoking cessation in women: a randomized controlled trial Arch Intern Med. 1999 Jun 14;159(11):1229-34.

Contact information of developer(s) and/or implementer(s)

Center for Behavioural and Preventative Medicine-(Drs. Bess H. Marcus [Center for Behavioural and Preventative Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, 164 Summit Ave. Providence, RI 02906], King, Pinto, Ntaura, Abrams, and Mss Albrecht and Roberts) and Division of Cardiology (Dr. Parisi), The Miriam Hospital and Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI. Beth Bock, PHD, Belinda Borrelli, PhD, Regina Traficante, MA and Janice Tripolone, MS

Intervention Focus

Intervention Goal / ObjectiveLevel(s) TargetedEquity Focus
To determine if exercise, a healthful alternative to smoking, enhances the achievement and maintenance of smoking cessation.
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Continuous Abstinence.
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Increase functional capacity -VO2 peak.
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Less weight gain.
  • Individual level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are not explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.

Health Issue(s) that is/are addressed by the Intervention

Health Promotion

    Risk Reduction

    • Prevent/reduce alcohol use/abuse

    Specific Activities of the Intervention

    • Educational health information offered
    • Information sessions offered about a risk factor or condition
    • Group process/program

    Priority/Target Population for Intervention Delivery

    Life Stage

    • Adults (age 25-64 years)

    Settings

    Educational Settings

      Community Setting

      • Community/neighbourhood

      Outcomes

      Outcomes and Impact Chart
      Level of ImpactDescription of OutcomeEquity Focus
      Individual Level

      Continuous Abstinence (SD)

      8 weeks follow-up: Exercise subjects were more abstinent than control group after quit day: 19.4% vs 10.2%, P=0.03

      20 weeks follow up: Exercise subjects were more abstinent than control group after quit day: 16.4% vs 8.2%, P=0.03

      60 weeks follow up: Exercise subjects were more abstinent than control group after quit day: 11.9% vs 5.4%, P=0.05

      Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.
      Individual Level

      Less weight gain-(SD) quitters gained significantly more weight than non-quitters after 2, 8, 20 and 60 weeks (P<0.01) for each of continuous abstinence. Exercise subjects had gained significantly less weight than control subjects at the end of the treatment (3.05+/-3.45 vs. 5.40+/-6.94 kg, P=0.03).

      Reported outcomes do not distinguish findings specific to people living in conditions of disadvantage.

      Adaptability

      Implementation History

      • Implemented once (could be a pilot) - The intervention has been implemented once and is theoretically replicable elsewhere.

      Expertise Required for Implementation within the Context of the Intervention

      • Requires specialized skills that are easily available within the context - The intervention requires the participation of personnel with advanced skills (e.g. medical doctors, epidemiologists, social workers) but that are easily available within the intervention context.

      Are there supports available for implementation

      No.

      Are there resources and/or products associated with the interventions

      Yes. Sessions were supervised by an exercise specialist, who documented the subjects' heart rates and perceived exertion levels during exercise sessions.