Interventions

The Best Practices Section of the Portal is a searchable list of chronic disease prevention and health promotion interventions which provides program planners and public health practitioners with easy and immediate access to successful public health programs, interventions and policies that have been evaluated and have the potential to be adapted and used.

Featured Interventions

  • SmokeChange

    Categories associated with best practice:

    • BP icon
    • Individual
    • Healthy child development
    • Home
    • Maternal and Infant Health
    • Personal health practices and coping skills
    • Physical environment
    • Prenatal
    • Tobacco Use Icon 1

    SmokeChange is an intervention to reduce pregnant women’s exposure to smoking. A SmokeChange educator works with women and their families for up to one year to assist with making changes including smoking less, stopping smoking, and/or decreasing exposure to smoke …

  • Communities that Care

    Categories associated with best practice:

    • BP icon
    • Community
    • Teens (ages 13-18) icon
    • Alcohol Abuse Icon 1
    • Community/ Neighbourhood
    • Harm Reduction (re drug use)
    • Mental Health Icon 2
    • Secondary School Icon 1
    • Social Support Networks

    Communities That Care (CTC) is a risk-and-protection-based system that enables local communities to engage in multi-level, multi-sectoral prevention planning and implement evidence-based programs. The purpose of CTC is to prevent common youth problems (substance abuse, delinquency, violence, teen pregnancy, school …

  • Telephone Based Peer Support

    Categories associated with best practice:

    • BP icon
    • Young Adult (ages 19-24) icon
    • Adult (ages 25-64) icon
    • Canada
    • English
    • Home
    • Maternal and Infant Health
    • Mental Health Icon 2
    • Personal health practices and coping skills
    • Social Relationships That Respect Diversity
    • Social Support Networks

    In this Ontario-based study, mothers who were within 2 weeks postpartum and were exhibiting beginning depressive symptomology received usual postpartum care plus telephone-based peer support from mothers who had previously experienced and recovered from postpartum depression. Peer volunteers provided emotional, …