Best Practices

The Best Practices Section of the Portal is a searchable list of chronic disease prevention and health promotion interventions which provides program planners and public health practitioners with easy and immediate access to successful public health programs, interventions and policies that have been evaluated and have the potential to be adapted and used.

Featured Best Practices

  • Home Support Exercise Program

    Categories associated with best practice:

    • Canada
    • Health Services
    • Home
    • Individual education/skill development
    • Older adults (age 50-69)
    • Older adults (age 50-69)
    • Personal health practices and coping skills
    • Physical Activity
    • Seniors (age 70+)

    The Home Support Exercise Program (HSEP) targets frail older adults. After a 4-hr training workshop, home-support workers (HSWs) encourage clients to do a simple, progressive set of 10 exercises during regular visits. The intervention is designed to be implemented for …

  • PATHS® Preschool/Kindergarten

    Categories associated with best practice:

    • Behaviour change
    • daycare
    • Elementary School
    • Healthy child development
    • Individual education/skill development
    • Mental Health
    • Preventing Violence
    • Social environmental support

    PATHS is a universal, teacher-taught social-emotional curriculum that is designed to improve children’s social competence and reduce problem behaviour. The PATHS program covers these five domains: self-control emotional understanding positive self-esteem relationships nterpersonal problem-solving skills. The PATHS program provides teachers …

  • Physical Activity in Sedentary Working Women

    Categories associated with best practice:

    • Adults (age 35-49)
    • Behaviour change
    • Female
    • Integrate Chronic Disease Prevention
    • Physical Activity
    • Workplace

    This study examines the effectiveness of a brief, tailored counselling intervention for increasing physical activity in sedentary women when delivered in the workplace. This study links to the systematic review evidence provided in the following article: David Ogilvie, Charles E …