Aboriginal Youth Mentorship Program (AYMP)

Categories:

Categories associated with best practice:

  • Health Equity
  • Individual
  • wtt_ico
  • Children (ages 6-12) icon
  • Teens (ages 13-18) icon
  • Before-After School Icon 1
  • Canada
  • Culture
  • Diabetes icon 3
  • Education and literacy
  • English
  • Health Literacy
  • Healthy child development
  • Healthy Eating
  • Obesity Prevention
  • Personal health practices and coping skills
  • Physical Activity
  • Secondary School Icon 1
  • Social environments
  • Social Relationships That Respect Diversity

Determinants of Health: Language and culture, Personal health practices and coping skills, Education, literacy and life-long learning, Social environments, Social relationships (including those that respect diversity), Healthy child development

Overview

The AYMP is a 90 minute once per week after-school, peer led, health promotion program based on multi-age mentoring of children aged 10 years by grades 7 through grade 12 students to reduce risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

The program was developed and delivered in partnership with the community and university at the request of the regional health authority with collaboration between study investigators and stakeholders in Garden Hill (Kistiganwacheeng) First Nation Manitoba following the principles of participatory action research and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Curriculum was developed by teachers and Aboriginal youth in Winnipeg. AYMP was designed to improve wholistic health in youth by providing programmatic components that are targeted at a child’s social health, physical health, mental health and spiritual health. All aspects of indigenous culture are integrated into this program.

This initiative was carried out successfully in Garden Hill, an isolated First Nation reserve community in northern Manitoba, where the incidence of Type 2 diabetes among youth is exceptionally high.

The weekly sessions included a healthy snack, 45 minutes of physical activity and an educational game or activity. The skills of youth mentors were expanded to enhance their ability to provide instruction and support to younger children.

Significant decreases in the risk factors associated with diabetes were noted. Authors stated that the risk of metabolic syndrome was reduced by 12% among participants.

his is a very significant research project that has successfully for the first time achieved a positive impact on the risk of Type 2 diabetes among very high risk First Nations children. The curriculum is an excellent resource to guide future work in this area.

Primary Source Document

P Eskicioglu, J Halas, M Sénéchal, L Wood, E McKay, S Villeneuve, GX. Shen, H Dean, and JM. McGavock, Peer Mentoring for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention in First Nations Children Pediatrics Volume 133,

Contact information of developer(s) and/or implementer(s)

ABORIGINAL YOUTH MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
Faculty of Kinesiology & Recreation Management
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2
Joannie Halas
Phone 2040-474-6061 • Fax 204-474-7634
Email: halasjm@cc.umanitoba.ca

Garden Hill (Kistiganwacheeng) First Nation
Garden Hill, MB R0B 0T0

Intervention Focus

Intervention Goal / ObjectiveLevel(s) TargetedEquity Focus
Assess the efficacy of an afterschool, peer-led, healthy living program on adiposity, self-efficacy, and knowledge of healthy living behaviors in children living in a remote isolated First Nations communities.
  • Individual level
  • Interpersonal level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Develop and deliver relationship based communal mentor programs involving children youth and adult allies from diverse cultural backgrounds.
  • Individual level
  • Interpersonal level
  • Organizational level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Informed by Indigenous worldviews and practices seek to build on the strengths of youth from diverse populations to build healthy inclusive communities.
  • Community level
  • Individual level
  • Interpersonal level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Educate and support physical activity sport and recreation leaders and allies to become culturally relevant educators.
  • Individual level
  • Interpersonal level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.
Nurture leadership and educational success of youth from diverse populations while simultaneously developing career pathways.
  • Individual level
  • Interpersonal level
People living in conditions of disadvantage are explicitly stated to be a target population of the intervention.

Health Issue(s) that is/are addressed by the Intervention

Health Promotion

  • Healthy Eating
  • Heathy Literacy
  • Physical Activity

Risk Reduction

    Specific Activities of the Intervention

    • Educational health information offered
    • Training offered to deliver the intervention
    • Group process/program
    • Partnership development
    • People living in conditions of disadvantage were included in decision-making processes.

    Priority/Target Population for Intervention Delivery

    Life Stage

    • Children (age 6-12 years)
    • Youth (age 13-18 years)

    Settings

    Educational Settings

    • Secondary/Middle school
    • Before/after school childcare (ages 5-12)

    Community Setting

      N/A

      Outcomes

      Outcomes and Impact Chart
      Level of ImpactDescription of OutcomeEquity Focus
      Individual LevelWaist circumference was measured in duplicate to the nearest 0.5 cm with a flexible tape measure in a standing position at the peak of the iliac crest. AYMP curriculum was effective at attenuating waist circumference. Outcomes are reported for people living in conditions of disadvantage, and are not compared to people living in more advantaged conditions.
      Individual LevelBMI z (standard deviation) score, calculated from height and weight measurements and converted to a z score based on normative data from age- and gender matched children in the USA using specialized software (Epi Info, CDC). While effect size was modest, compared with intensive weight loss programs, it was greater than those seen in previous school- based interventions. Outcomes are reported for people living in conditions of disadvantage, and are not compared to people living in more advantaged conditions.
      Individual LevelExploratory outcomes assessed included self-reported measures of self-efficacy as well as physical activity and healthy eating knowledge using a reliable and validated tool used in previous school-based peer-mentoring interventions. Outcomes are reported for people living in conditions of disadvantage, and are not compared to people living in more advantaged conditions.
      Individual LevelBody satisfaction assessed using a visual Likert scale depicting silhouettes of 7 body types ranging from very lean to overweight, and children were asked to select the body image that they most resembled and another that they most desired resembling. Outcomes are reported for people living in conditions of disadvantage, and are not compared to people living in more advantaged conditions.

      Adaptability

      Implementation History

      • Implemented twice (the first implementation could have been a pilot) - The intervention has been implemented a second time in the same setting with the same population by similar providers, and is theoretically applicable to other settings and/or populations. This can include a second implementation during the same time period. *Each implementation of the intervention must have been substantially the same and must have demonstrated positive results for the primary objectives of the intervention.

      Expertise Required for Implementation within the Context of the Intervention

      • Specialized skills training provided as part of the Intervention - The intervention does not require individuals or groups with highly specialized training, but requires that individuals or groups be trained as part of the implementation of the intervention.

      Are there supports available for implementation

      No.

      Are there resources and/or products associated with the interventions

      Yes. The REC & READ Aboriginal Youth Mentor Program: A ‘How?To’ Manual http://www.recconnections.com/assets/after_school/mentor-manual-2010-march.pdf